Public health is what we, as a society, do collectively to assure the conditions for people to be “healthy”. Any issue affecting a society that has a prevalence, an impact on society, preventable suffering, effective interventions and equity issues, should be considered a public health issue. Given the universality of death, dying, loss and bereavement, palliative care is increasingly being seen around the world as a true public health issue. Much of the world has already mobilized around palliative care as a public health issue and a theory of practice to do so, has been articulated and embraced. This theory of practice that helps us mobilize on palliative care as a public health issue is known internationally as the Compassionate Cities or Compassionate Communities model.

Pallium Canada is invested in helping Canada mobilize around Palliative Care as a public health issue, and in particular, to understand, adapt and adopt the Compassionate Communities paradigm. Through knowledge translation, education, project facilitation and leadership, Pallium Canada invites citizens, communities, care-providers, schools, businesses, educators and organizations to learn about Compassionate Communities and to “re-embrace” and then engage, in this vital social transformation. To learn more about Pallium Canada’s work on Compassionate Communities, and to grow in understanding and connections, check out all the Compassionate Communities (CC) links on this website or contact Pallium Canada’s Compassionate Communities Co-Leads, Dr. Denise Marshall and Dr. Kathy Kortes-Miller.